Deep Dialogue: Readings on Race and Ethnicity

When:
September 7, 2017 @ 1:00 pm – October 14, 2017 @ 2:00 pm
2017-09-07T13:00:00-04:00
2017-10-14T14:00:00-04:00

Deep Dialogue: Readings on Race and Ethnicity General Information
For information on each event, see separate listings on the Writers Guild page.

Sponsored by the Writers Guild at Bloomington and Indiana University’s Office of the Vice President for Diversity, Equity, and Multicultural Affairs, with funding from the Indiana Humanities with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities

This multiple event project will highlight four contemporary poets whose writing explores the meanings of race, history, beloved community and healing.

There are six events, starting with a panel open to the public to provide historical foundations of the racial/ethnic groups being discussed and the impact of literature in revealing the experiences of these groups. This is followed by four workshops that offer shared readings, done out loud, of the selected poems accompanied by discussion. The project will close with a Feedback event, allowing workshop attendees to come together and evaluate the impact of the workshops, and discuss how this work might be continued in the future.

The Workshops are facilitated by Professor Maria Hamilton Abegunde and Patsy Rahn.

You are welcomed to come to the Panel and to register to attend any of the workshops.
If you plan to come to any of the Workshops we encourage you to attend the opening Panel as well.
You will receive a copy of the book used in each workshop you participate in.

Register:


Event Schedule:

FAQ:

What is the Lectio Divina process?

If you have any questions after reading our FAQ page, please contact us at: contact@writersguildbloomington.com

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Indiana Humanities/NEH INcommon Grant
“Indiana Humanities is pleased to award seven new projects through our INcommon Grants, as part of the NEH’s Humanities and the Legacy of Race and Ethnicity initiative. The projects, which will bring Hoosiers together to consider the persistent social, economic, cultural and racial issues that confront our communities, demonstrate how the humanities are vitally relevant for tackling issues in our state.

The goal of INcommon was to seed projects that creatively and thoughtfully used humanities ideas, readings and scholars to spark in-depth conversation, insight and consideration into others’ points of view. Each of these projects not only will create powerful and meaningful learning opportunities for Hoosiers, they also serve as models of public humanities excellence.”

Thanks to The Childminding Shop in the UK for the image of multiple hand prints.

Photos of Professor Maria Hamilton Abegunde and Patsy Rahn

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